Progress Diary

December 2011
Royal Victoria Building Begins to Take Shape

RVB corridor 
 

The Royal Victoria Building is forging ahead.

The interior of the £43.6m purpose-built facility is taking shape as the corridors, single bedrooms, garden and day rooms begin to emerge from the building’s shell.

The first of the 12 units of the development was “locked down” in late October – meaning that all the internal work, painting, flooring and fixtures has been completed, leaving construction workers free to move on to the next units.

RVB corridor 2 
 

The specially-designed features, such as sleek bathroom pods, extra large windows and bright and airy rooms, are becoming a reality.

RVB corridor 3 
 

Sue Gardiner, project manager of the RVB, said: “This a really exciting time for the development.

“We have been working at the drawing board for a long time to ensure that patients have the highest quality environment in a facility which meets their exacting needs, so it is marvellous to see these things coming to life.”

The RVB has been designed to provide the highest quality healthcare services in a modern setting and meet the needs of patients aged 65 and over as well as rheumatology and dermatology patients.

It will become a landmark in Scottish healthcare history when it opens in 2012 by becoming the first of its kind in Scotland to consist of 100 per cent single rooms to promote privacy and dignity.

The team has worked closely with patient groups and watched the progress of similar projects, such as in Hillingdon Hospital, Middlesex, to create the best environment possible.

Patients will generally only spend a short time in the RVB as they recover and go through rehabilitation, but the team has taken further steps to ensure that single rooms do not lead to loneliness.

Dining rooms and day rooms have been created to let the patients, who are able to move around, mingle when they choose and have privacy when they require.

Staff bases are also spread around wards to encourage more interaction with clinicians and patients, while room windows have been designed to allow staff to see the whole room at once to help them react swiftly to any potential problems.

March 2011
Changes to the partial closure of Porterfield Road

As you may already be aware, Porterfield Road has been closed for the past four weeks to allow for ongoing construction work for the new Royal Victoria Building.

To allow construction work to progress further, the partial closure to Porterfield Road will be extended until Wednesday 20 April.

The closure will be moved from the middle of Porterfield Road to the exit from Porterfield Road onto Crewe Road South. This will mean that Porterfield Road will be two-way and access to the hospital will revert to the normal Porterfield Road entrance.

Map showing closure of Porterfield Road 

Traffic exiting from the multi-storey car park will be redirected back along Porterfield Road. Pedestrian access to the hospital from the multi-storey car park will resume to normal.

Pedestrians from Crewe Road South will be redirected to enter Porterfield Road by the entrance road as there will be no pedestrian access at the exit to Porterfield Road.

Buses which usually stop at the bus stop on the Western General site will stop on the bus stop on Crewe Road South instead. The staff shuttle bus will stop at the bus stop outside the Western General on Crewe Road South and will depart from the bus stop on the opposite side of the road.

From Thursday 21 April, access to the hospital will be restored to normal.

These arrangements will be clearly signposted to ensure minimal disruption is caused.

January 2011

Construction continues on Royal Victoria Building

Photo of Construction site for the Royal Victoria Hospital Building 

Photo of Construction site for the Royal Victoria Hospital Building 

 

Despite the severe weather we have seen over the winter, construction on the £43.6 million new Royal Victoria Building is continuing to progress.

Main contractor Laing O’Rourke are confident that the impact of the weather can be minimised thanks to the innovative construction technologies being used. Structural components are engineered and manufactured at an off-site specialist facility enabling wall panels with in-situ windows to be delivered for incorporation into the building frame.

Meanwhile staff awareness meetings in the Royal Victoria and Western General Hospitals have been taking place to update people on the project and to answer any questions they have about the eventual move to the new site in 2012.

Sue said: This is an important part of the communications process as some people are naturally anxious about the transfer of services to the Western. We are able to answer any questions they have and help smooth that journey.

When it is officially opened, the purpose-built facility will have five wards dedicated to elderly patients and one ward specialising in rheumatology and dermatology – all with single rooms to promote privacy and dignity.

June 2010

Turf cut on new development

Photo of Nicola Sturgeon and Dr Charles Winstanley at Royal Victoria Hospital Construction site 

Construction work has begun on the £43.6m Royal Victoria Building after Nicola Sturgeon cut the ground on the exciting new development.

Ms Sturgeon said: "Scotland’s NHS has taken an exciting first step today towards providing all patients with their own single rooms. This is all about ensuring patients have a high quality environment during their stay, more privacy for themselves and their families and that we do everything we can to reduce the risk of infection.
"Importantly, by investing in patient care we are also investing in the economy, supporting the construction industry and sustaining jobs."

The RVB is due to be completed in 2012 after it was given the green light by the Scottish Government’s Capital Investment Group (CIG), which gives final approval on major projects for the NHS north of the Border.

Dr Charles Winstanley, Chairman, NHS Lothian, said: "This ground cutting ceremony marks an important milestone in the creation of this state-of-the-art facility.
"It is the first of its kind in Scotland and will make a real difference to patient care by providing increased privacy and dignity, which promotes a healing environment."

May 2010

Time capsule discovered

Phot showing contents of time capsule 

A forgotten time capsule has been unearthed by building workers as they create a brand new hospital building.

A construction worker made the find as an old building was demolished to make way for the new Royal Victoria Building (RVB) at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh.

The treasure trove, which dates back nearly 100 years, was found sealed in a glass jar inside a large stone.

Project Manager Sue Gardiner said: "We were unaware that a time capsule had ever been created and stored on the site. It came as a real surprise. We intend to keep the contents for generations to come and will create a display in the new Royal Victoria Building."

The time capsule had been sealed 97 years ago in 1913 to mark the creation of a new children’s home for the Craigleith Hospital and Poorhouse, which went on to become the site of the modern-day Western General Hospital.

Laura Brouard, Assistant Archivist, of Lothian Health Services Archive (LHSA), said: "Surprisingly, given the length of time that it has been buried, the capsule’s contents are extremely well preserved. They provide a fascinating insight into the origins of the Children’s Home at Craigleith Poorhouse, later part of the Western General Hospital."

The collection will now be added into the LHSA and it is planned that replicas will be put on display in the new building when it is complete in 2012.

Artist Impression of new Royal Victoria Hospital building entrance 

Scottish Government Approval

Work will begin on the new £43.6m Royal Victoria Building (RVB) after it was given the final go-ahead by the Scottish Government.

The new facility, which has been designed specially to meet the needs of elderly, rheumatology, and dermatology patients, will be created after funding was approved.

It means that NHS Lothian’s vision for the future of elderly care services will now become a reality.

Jackie Sansbury, Director of Strategic Planning and Modernisation, said: "We are delighted that the final stage of planning has now been completed and we can start building this state-of-the-art facility for patients in NHS Lothian."

The Paderewski building has been demolished to make way for the new era in healthcare after staff and patients recently said a fond farewell.

Bulldozers moved on to the site, along with water jets to reduce dust, to bring down the building which became home to the Polish School of Medicine in 1941 for eight years until 1949.

Photo of bulldozer demolishing Paderewski building 

Car park opens

A brand new car park designed to provide extra spaces on the Western General Hospital site has also been created behind the old building.

The double deck car park, which sits opposite the former car park one, has more than 200 spaces for visitors and patients, which will all be used free of charge.

It sits beside the Anne Ferguson building and visitors arriving by car will be able to use the most convenient areas.

April 2010

Planning permission granted

The new £43.6m Royal Victoria building has taken an important step forward after it was granted planning permission.

The project was given the green light by City of Edinburgh Council and will now be submitted to the Scottish Government for final approval.

It means that the building, is reaching the final phases.

Jackie Sansbury, Director of Strategic Planning and Modernisation, said: "This is an important milestone for the new Royal Victoria building and means we are a step closer to providing a state-of-the-art facility.
"A great deal of work has gone into the planning of this new facility with patients, carers and staff. It means the facility is moving towards becoming a reality."

March 2010

Full business case approved

The new £43.6m Royal Victoria Building (RVB) has reached a new milestone after the full business case was approved.

The final plan was agreed by NHS Lothian in February and will now be submitted to the Scottish Government for approval.

It has been designed to provide the highest quality healthcare services in a modern setting and would consist only of 100 per cent single rooms to promote privacy and dignity.

The building, due to be completed in 2012, is now in the final phases of the three-part process.

The initial agreement was first granted in January 2006, before the outline business case was approved in 2008, subject to planning permission.

The full business case was approved on the same conditions by NHS Lothian and will now be submitted to the Scottish Government’s Capital Investment Group (CIG), which gives final approval on major projects for the NHS north of the Border.

August 2008

Outline Business Case approval

We have now completed and gained approval from the Scottish Government Capital Investment Group for the outline business case, which identifies and costs all the work to be undertaken in the reprovision of the Royal Victoria Hospital services. This work identified the preferred option for the reprovision of medicine for the elderly services at the Western General Hospital.

Other operational working groups or specific managers are taking forward the other parts of the reprovision as individual projects.

The option that has been identified to deliver the medicine for the elderly services at the Western General Hospital is to provide a brand new purpose-built building on the site of the present Paderewski Building.

Incorporated within the business case are the costs and plans to provide a decked car park above the existing car park at Crewe Road South exit gate.

The next stage in the project is to draw up detailed design requirements and then select and appoint design and build contractors. A full business case has then to be submitted and approved by the Scottish Government before the first foundations for our new facility can be laid.

July 2008

Re-provision of Royal Victoria Hospital Services Project Group Structure and Membership

June 2008

Plans given green light

Plans to re-provide medical services for the elderly currently provided at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Edinburgh have been given the go-ahead.

NHS Lothian has approved the outline business case, subject to obtaining Local Authority planning consent. This is a key stage in the development process set out by the Scottish Government.

The proposals are for medical services for patients over 65 years of age to be re-provided in a new facility to be built on the Western General Hospital site which is adjacent to the current hospital. These services will include medical in-patient and out-patient services and the medical day hospital.

Dr Charles Winstanley, Chair, NHS Lothian said: "I am absolutely delighted that our plans to provide this brand new facility are moving forward."
Violet Laidlaw, Patient Focus Public Involvement group representative and member of the Older People’s Equality Forum said: "I’m really glad that the hospital is moving to new premises and I know being an older person myself that it will be reassuring knowing that the services will be provided in an appropriate, modern setting.
"I think it is a real plus point that there has been so much public involvement and that the views of people like myself have been taken on board. This has been important in developing the new building."

January 2008

Outline Business Case being finalised

We are finalising the Outline Business Case, which identifies and costs all the work to be undertaken in the re-provision of the Royal Victoria Hospital services.

This will include various possible options that could be implemented to re-provide the medical services at the Western General Hospital. These are then costed, appraised and weighted against specific criteria.

This document sets out the possible funding methods. This work is being undertaken by the Business Case Working Group, which includes representation from Clinical, Finance, Health Intelligence, Capital Planning and Estates.

Once the preferred option is identified and accepted by the NHS Lothian Board the document has to be submitted to the Scottish Government and the Scottish Government Capital Investment Group.​​

Last Reviewed: 13/01/2012